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EMERALD ASH BORER: VIGILANCE IS THE KEY

Accidentally introduced into Canada and the United States, the emerald ash borer is a coleoprtera from Asia, eight to 14 mm in length, which attacks ash trees…as the name indicates. Because this insect pest is now present in this region, the ash trees of the territory of Mont-Tremblant risk becoming infested. It should be noted that in general, an infested ash dies after only a few years. 

Because the majority of ash trees are found on private property, the people of Mont-Tremblant have an important role to play to slow the progression of the borer. All owners are asked to check for the presence of ash trees on their land and, if the trees are present, to take action immediately. 

RECOGNIZING THE PRESENCE OF THE EMERALD ASH BORER 

When you have identified the ash trees, here are the signs of infestation to watch for:

  • premature yellowing of the foliage;
  • dying branches;
  • thinning foliage in the crown of the tree (treetop); 
  • D-shaped holes visible on the bark; 
  • winding, S-shaped tunnels under the bark; 
  • numerous suckers (young branches) on the tree trunk. 

TREATMENTS

Two types of intervention can be undertaken depending on the level of infestation and of decline of the tree.

  • Treat the ash with TreeAzin®, an injectable insecticide. It is recommended that treatments of ash tree(s) be started as soon as the emerald ash borer is present in the district and before the tree shows any signs of infestation. 
  • Cut down the diseased tree to limit propagation of the insect to nearby healthy ash trees. 

IMPORTANT REMINDERS IF A TREE MUST BE TREATED (INJECTED OR CUT DOWN) 

  • A certificate of authorization (free) delivered by the City is required before proceeding with cutting down or treatment of any tree on the territory. 
  • Cutting and pruning of ash trees is not recommended between March 15 and October 1 to limit the propagation of the beetle. 
  • If the ash must be cut down, the remains of the tree must be chipped at the site with a chipper that meets the standards of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to limit propagation. 

PREVENTION: DON’T MOVE FIREWOOD!

Propagation of the emerald ash borer is most often caused or promoted by moving untreated firewood from or to a camping area, chalet or cabin. 

To find out more, contact the Department of the Environment and of Sustainable Development at 819 425- 8614, extension 2604 or by email to environnement@villedemont-tremblant.qc.ca.